NEW eBooks About Math -- check them out!

Monday, September 24, 2007

God, Math & Crime

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Are Science and God mutually exclusive? Here's a way to find out. Or you can wrap you're mind around how advanced Mathematics is used to solve crime. In either case both of these books are sure to give you something to think about.

Spiritual Brain, The eBook edition by Beauregard, Mario
Do religious experiences come from God, or are they merely the random firing of neurons in the brain? Drawing on his own research with Carmelite nuns, neuroscientist Mario Beauregard shows that genuine, life-changing spiritual events can be documented. He offers compelling evidence that religious experiences have a nonmaterial origin, making a convincing case for what many in scientific fields are loath to consider—that it is God who creates our spiritual experiences, not the brain.
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The Numbers Behind Numb3rs eBook edition by Devlin, Keith, Lorden, Gary
Using the popular CBS prime-time TV crime series Numb3rs as a springboard, Keith Devlin (known to millions of NPR listeners as "the Math Guy" on NPR's Weekend Edition with Scott Simon) and Gary Lorden (the principal math advisor to Numb3rs) explain real-life mathematical techniques used by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies to catch and convict criminals. From forensics to counterterrorism, the Riemann hypothesis to image enhancement, solving murders to beating casinos, Devlin and Lorden present compelling cases that illustrate how advanced mathematics can be used in state-of-the-art criminal investigations
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Buy either of these titles this week, and recieve an extra 5% off your total purchase - so read all you want - these titles and much more await you at eBooksAboutEverything.com!
Use the following coupon code at checkout:
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Friday, September 7, 2007

This is Your Brain, This is Your Brain on IPhone...

The IPhone Book

You can't deny the appeal of the IPhone... or can you? With the recent hoopla over the price point drop - unhappy stockholders, angry early adopters, and exuberant price watchers who may think that the two-hundred dollar price drop was just what they needed to get them to run out to the nearest Apple store - And Still, all I see is pretty form factor. I just simply want one. So, this first week's title is to help IPhone owners get the best of their gadget. The next title may help me understand what I find so sexy about the IPhone... why does it, work for me? Does it have anything to do with gender related brain differences? Inquiring minds want to know. Be sure to check out this week's special discount code below - no, it's not $200.00 bucks off your IPhone... but it's still good.

The Iphone Book: How to Do the Things You Want to Do with Your Iphone (Adobe Reader) eBook edition
by Kelby, Scott, White, Terry

There are basically two types of iPhone books out there: (1) The "Tell-me-all-about-it" kind, which includes in-depth discussions on everything from wireless network protocols to advanced compression codes. (2) Then there's this book, which instead is a "show-me-how-to-do-it" book, that skips all the confusing techno-jargon and just tells you, in plain simple English, exactly how to use the iPhone features you want to use most.

The iPhone Book is from Scott Kelby, the award-winning author of the smash bestseller, The iPod Book, who takes that same highly-acclaimed, casual, straight-to-the-point concept and layout and brings it to learning Apple's amazing iPhone. Scott teams up once again with gadget guru, and leading iPhone authority, Terry White to put together a book that is an awful lot like the iPhone itself-simple to use and fun to learn. The book's layout is brilliant, with each page covering just one single topic, so finding the information you need is quick and easy, with a large full-color photo on each page so you can see exactly how it works.

You'll quickly learn how to use the most useful and most requested iPhone features so you can start having fun, and start really using your iPhone today-right now! If you're ready to learn "just the funk and not the junk," it's all here-in the only book of its kind-and you're going to love it.

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FEMALE BRAIN eBook edition
by Brizendine, Louann Md
CHAPTER ONE
The Birth of the Female Brain

Leila was a busy little bee, flitting around the playground, connecting with the other children whether or not she knew them. On the verge of speaking in two- and three-word phrases, she mostly used her contagious smile and emphatic nods of her head to communicate, and communicate she did. So did the other little girls. "Dolly," said one. "Shopping," said another. There was a pint-size community forming, abuzz with chatter, games, and imaginary families.

Leila was always happy to see her cousin Joseph when he joined her on the playground, but her joy never lasted long. Joseph grabbed the blocks she and her friends were using to make a house. He wanted to build a rocket, and build it by himself. His pals would wreck anything that Leila and her friends had created. The boys pushed the girls around, refused to take turns, and would ignore a girl's request to stop or give the toy back. By the end of the morning, Leila had retreated to the other end of the play area with the girls. They wanted to play house quietly together.

Common sense tells us that boys and girls behave differently. We see it every day at home, on the playground, and in classrooms. But what the culture hasn't told us is that the brain dictates these divergent behaviors. The impulses of children are so innate that they kick in even if we adults try to nudge them in another direction. One of my patients gave her three-and-a-half-year-old daughter many unisex toys, including a bright red fire truck instead of a doll. She walked into her daughter's room one afternoon to find her cuddling the truck in a baby blanket, rocking it back and forth saying, "Don't worry, little truckie, everything will be all right."

This isn't socialization. This little girl didn't cuddle her "truckie" because her environment molded her unisex brain. There is no unisex brain. She was born with a female brain, which came complete with its own impulses. Girls arrive already wired as girls, and boys arrive already wired as boys. Their brains are different by the time they're born, and their brains are what drive their impulses, values, and their very reality.

The brain shapes the way we see, hear, smell, and taste. Nerves run from our sense organs directly to the brain, and the brain does all the interpreting. A good conk on the head in the right place can mean that you won't be able to smell or taste. But the brain does more than that. It profoundly affects how we conceptualize the world--whether we think a person is good or bad, if we like the weather today or it makes us unhappy, or whether we're inclined to take care of the day's business. You don't have to be a neuroscientist to know this. If you're feeling a little down and have a nice glass of wine or a lovely piece of chocolate, your attitude can shift. A gray, cloudy day can turn bright, or irritation with a loved one can evaporate because of the way the chemicals in those substances affect the brain. Your immediate reality can change in an instant.

If chemicals acting on the brain can create different realities, what happens when two brains have different structures? There's no question that their realities will be different. Brain damage, strokes, prefrontal lobotomies, and head injuries can change what's important to a person. They can even change one's personality from aggressive to meek or from kind
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Buy either of these titles this week, and recieve an extra 5% off your total purchase - so you'll get a break on these essential titles as well as all of that leisure reading you'll have time to do now! Use the following coupon code at checkout:
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